Monday, 1 August 2016

Domiciliary admissions

On Friday, a GP phoned the integrated care hub in the community hospital I work in to request an admission for a lady bed bound at home, and in need of medical attention. We took her details, made sure the ward was ready for her and organised transport to bring her in.

Ordinarily, a team would wait for her to arrive and assess her when she was in her bed. Ordinarily, she would be brought on to the ward, sometimes after an interminable delay waiting for transport, and then be assessed by a nurse, then a doctor, and then acclimatise herself to the unfamiliar environment she found herself in.

Ordinary is boring. I wanted to do something a little different. Instead of waiting for her to arrive, I picked up my computer, my bag, and a drug chart, and I drove round to her house. I clerked her in her bedroom. I assessed her medical needs, I had a quick look around her house, and I met her husband. The ambulance arrived while I was still there, and I was able to talk to the crew about her needs. I spoke with her about what I thought was going on, and outlined to her how we would try to help when she arrived in hospital.

After I finished at her house, I popped round to a couple of other patients at home, and by the time I arrived back at the hospital, she was there, at her bed, looking both relaxed and relieved.

Seeing her at home might seem like a small thing. It might seem like a massively inconvenient thing, But it was also very useful. For some time already, I have given up out-patients clinics and only see patients at home. I find it is more relaxing for them, and useful for me. When you see someone in their own home, you instantly get a feel for how they are actually managing. In the same way, by assessing this lady at home, I could instantly get a feel for what she needed from me. It was also, surprising and reassuring for her to meet one of the doctors who would be looking after her in hospital, before she arrived.

I'm not saying that all patients could be assessed at home prior to admission, but I am saying that introducing  new ways of working that are designed around the needs of the patients you are trying to help can have a big impact on their experience and comfort with health services. I also suspect that it allows us to help them more effectively.

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