Sunday, 22 May 2016

Calm under fire.

I'm a little baffled by the new contract proposal. I don't understand how you can mentor someone who has been on maternity leave to make up the time spent as a mother and not a doctor: equality doesn't mean that to me. Only women can deliver babies - they shouldn't be disadvantaged by that reality. I also don't understand why night shifts that start at 7.30pm don't attract the same pay uplift as shifts that start at 8pm (it is entirely possible I have missed something), and I don't understand why the same contract discussion is still taking place when it has been well demonstrated that not only does this contract not solve the problem the government is trying to fix, but that the problem itself is not a problem. Surely, we do not still linger on the misconception that radical working changes are required to improve survival expectations of patients admitted at the weekends.

Guessing what lies beneath the contract chicanery is a fool's game: we can tell you what the evidence suggests to us - that the NHS is being teed up for greater private provider involvement, but the current political oversight of the NHS is something of an evidence-free zone. Who can reason out the illogical reasoning behind our current situation?

And this is the knuckle-gnawingly frustrating thing about the whole situation. Logic doesn't prevail. Evidence doesn't talk. It reminds me of what it is like trying to explain to my three year old why she can't have more ice cream, while she is having a hissy-fit about not having more ice cream. Nothing gets through.

I can't count the number of people who have shaken their heads patronisingly at me, and said that junior doctors are being naive, that this is politics. The implication is that politics goes by different rules, and we should be OK with that. We should be OK with a world in which reason, evidence and grown-up dialogue are usurped by the diaphanous concept of 'winning'.

Where the sad reality leaves us that is that there is no clean way out of this. Jeremy Hunt talked, the morning after a proposed contract was agreed, about this not being about who won, but how long will that last. Can junior doctors trust him not to go crowing about winning the day after they agree what has been proposed? Could they stomach what would come after if they rejected the new contract?

The Department of Health keeps reminding us that this is about providing a 7 day service to patients. I suspect many are not convinced about their real understanding of what this means. But we do. We all know the areas of our service that we want to improve, we all understand the limitations to achieving what it is that we want to achieve; yet I imagine many of us still have plans for what we are going to do next.

In this crazy world of doctors having to play politics, understand the nuances of PR and social media, we are all still going to work, delivering the best we can for our patients today, and thinking about making our future services better still. There are elements of the service we work in that we have no control over. We can't predict what the current Health secretary wants to do next, and we can't predict how the next one will want to make his or her impact. What we do know is that they will want to do something, because when was the last time a Health Secretary trusted the people who run and deliver healthcare services to know what the best thing to do next might be?

And it was ever thus. We have been tinkered with, reorganised, and in some cases catastrophically buggered around with, all in the name of improving what we do now, since the NHS began. And yet we have continued to deliver better healthcare. The care we deliver now is not perfect, but our outcomes are better now than they ever have been.

There is also a silver lining. When was the last time that consultants and junior doctors felt so connected? The sense of solidarity pervades the NHS. Consultants now have a better grasp not only on what the problems of being trainee are, but what the day to day frustrations they experience are. They may only have walked a few days in the shoes of their juniors, but it has been enough to erase the rose tint from their own memories of being a junior, and focus on the reality of that life today, in the current NHS.

So we have solidarity, but we still have the threat of imposed change. Of course we do - and it won't go away. But in reality, it doesn't change very much. We always operate within the limitations of our current framework, yet great change is always possible.

The system may be telling junior doctors that they aren't appreciated, but we don't need to toe that line. Consultants, nurses and therapists are all capable of creating teams that any junior doctor would want to work in, and of delivering better services together.

It's not much, I know, but perhaps we would do well to remember that any framework creates opportunities, and however down-trodden we feel right now, we can still hang on to the prospect of creating something better for our patients.

While the metaphorical mortar shells are flying overhead, we must keep calm under fire, and do what it is that we have always sought to do: put the patient first. 

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